How to Make Ice Blocks for Coolers – 12 Best Methods to Make Ice Blocks for Coolers

how to make ice blocks for coolers

There is nothing worse than a warm drink on a hot summer day, but how can you keep your beverages cold when the ice melts? How to make ice blocks for coolers?

Coolers are usually designed with an insulated layer at the bottom and sides to help maintain optimal temperatures inside of them. However, this insulation does not extend up into the top of the cooler where you put drinks or food in order to keep them fresh.

This means that every time there is a change in temperature (for example when it goes from humid outside into air conditioned house) water droplets will condense on whatever is stored at the top of your cooler and then drip down onto whatever else you have packed away below.

So how can you prevent this from happening?

The answer is to make ice blocks that are designed specifically for coolers.

Why is Block Ice so Popular?

Block ice lasts longer than ice cubes in freezer and cooler, making it a great option for food storage.

Block ice melts slower, too.

This means that the water droplets will not have enough time to drip down into your cooler and onto all of your other food items before they start to freeze again.

The only downside is how much space block ice takes up in a freezer or cooler because it’s typically used for longer periods of time. If you are looking for something smaller and more convenient, try using cooling packs instead.

Are Ice Blocks Better Option?

Blocks of ice will give you a longer lasting form of cold than crushed ice. The only downside is how much space block ice takes up in your freezer or cooler because it’s typically used for longer periods of time. If you are looking for something smaller and more convenient, try using cooling packs instead.

Making Convenient Ice Blocks for Coolers

If this doesn’t matter to you though, then you should be happy to know how easy it is to make your own ice blocks for coolers. All you need are:

Video Credit: raWr Fishing

Method 1 – a bag of water, a ziploc sealable container and freezer space

Place the sealed bag in the desired size away from other things that could cause leaks or punctures and freeze overnight. Once frozen, open the bag carefully so as not to break any pieces and place in your cooler or bucket without having liquid leak out. You can also fill up buckets with this before freezing them if they will fit better there. If you have an ice maker on hand already just use those cubes instead!

Method 2 – a tray, freezer space and ice packs

If you’re more of an outdoors type person who camps or just plain likes to enjoy the summer time, then you’ll be happy to know how easy it is to make ice blocks for coolers. You need:

A tray with edges that are at least one inch high (think Tupperware-style) Enough water to cover all spaces in your container A sealed bag from which liquid cannot leak into other areas inside the cooler The largest size ziploc sealable containers available A slotted spoon or similar utensil made out of plastic so as not break through any metal pieces in the container An outdoor refrigerator like those found on camping trips!

Method 3 – Pouches of ice and water

If you’re more of an outdoors type person who camps or just plain likes to enjoy the summer time, then you’ll be happy to know how easy it is to make ice blocks for coolers. You need: A tray with edges that are at least one inch high (think Tupperware-style) Enough water to cover all spaces in your container A sealed bag from which liquid cannot leak into other areas inside the cooler The largest size ziploc sealable containers available A slotted spoon or similar utensil made out of plastic so as not break through any metal pieces in the container An outdoor refrigerator like those found on camping trips!

Method 4 – DIY freezer space

A freezer space- or part of one if your entire freezer isn’t available. (Or a friend with a spare cube) Clear plastic sheets that come in multiple sizes and can be purchased on Amazon Plastic wrap from the grocery store Heavy duty aluminum foil -or- metal baking pans Scissors

Wrap all surfaces of your tray with clear plastic sheeting and then cover with heavy duty aluminum foil. Place it in the freezer until frozen solid. This process takes about 24 hours but no worries, as long as there’s room left over inside your freezer when you’re done. You may want to plan ahead to make sure there’s enough space for a tray.

Method 5 – Wrap and freeze in plastic wrap

Put an ice cube mold on top of some heavy duty aluminum foil (or parchment paper). Cut two pieces of plastic wrap, one about three times the size as the other. Place the smaller piece over your cubes or blocks and then place the larger piece over that. Use more if necessary to create extra padding all around so it will conform better when frozen solid.

Make holes through both layers with scissors before freezing to let out moisture while they’re still soft from being wrapped up too tight- this prevents them from bursting open once they’ve been thawed and you want to use them right away! Check how long these take by considering how long you usually leave your freezer door open.

Method 6 – Freeze in a Tupperware container with ice packs on top and bottom

Fill an old or new Tupperware container up with water to the brim, then place it in the freezer. Take two large ice cubes (or four small ones) and put them at either end of this tray-shaped body you’ve just created for your iced blocks. Then take some smaller cold packs, lay them over these frozen big cubes of water so they’ll stay colder longer than if they were left uncovered by any sort of insulation material, popsicle sticks work well too! You can also use zip-lock bags filled with crushed ice chunks as long as there’s plenty room for air circulation around the bag.

Method 7 – Freeze in a can with an intact bottom

Buy some soda cans; clear, plastic ones work really well because you can see how much ice is accumulating at the bottom of your iced block-to-be! Fill up these empty cans to the brim and put them in the freezer for about six hours or so. Take out one of these frozen sodas when it’s time to make your cooled drink blocks–you’ll know they’re ready if there are about two inches worth of ice cubes sitting on top and around the sides.

Tilt then upside down over a bowl (or, alternatively, a bucket) full of water that has been prechilled by running cold tap water through it until all those icy ice cubes fall right out into the waiting receptacle.

These frozen blocks will keep your drinks cold for hours–just make sure to layer them with freezer-friendly containers so they don’t melt and overflow all over everything!

Method 8 – Fill a kiddie pool with water, add ice and salt

If you happen to have access to an old plastic kiddie pool (or any other large container), then consider this how-to on how to make iced blocks for coolers: fill it up about three quarters of the way full with water that has been prechilled by running cold tap water through it until it’s nice and icy cold; toss in some as much table salt or kosher salt as you please–at least a cup, but how much salt you use is up to your personal preference; and then add ice cubes until the water reaches about an inch below the top of the pool.

The next step? Sit back and watch as these icy blocks magically make themselves in front of your eyes!

Method 9 – Pour boiling water over a tray with sugar on it

If you’re looking for how to make iced blocks for coolers that will stay cold longer than using just plain old snow or ice cubes, hot liquid can help achieve this goal–just be sure not to pour too many liquids into one cooler since they’ll have a tendency to dilute each other. As long as you don’t put any drinks near where steam from recently-poured boiling water might touch them and you have a tight-fitting lid to minimize how much vapor escapes, this method is just as good for keeping your drinks cold.

Method 10 – Freeze water in old soda bottles

Icy cubes are great–provided they’re not melting because of how long it takes them to freeze naturally on their own. If you want how to make ice blocks for coolers that will last longer than three hours in the sun, use an easy time-tested trick by freezing water inside old plastic soda bottles!

The best part about using these rubberized containers? You can stack more of them up if necessary without worrying about damaging any other surface or object under where they’ll be sitting (such as when stacking upside down).

Method 11 – DIY freezer space and bags of frozen fruit juice

This how to make ice blocks for coolers process is a little more time-intensive than many of the others, but it’s worth it. Start by filling freezer space with bags of frozen fruit juice–this will work as your how to make ice blocks for coolers’ water source. Once you have at least four or five layers going, pour in some salt so that there are about three tablespoons per gallon (or just over one tablespoon per quart) and then fill up any remaining gaps before freezing everything together!

Method 12 – Freeze beer bottles

If how to make ice blocks for coolers really want something unique that’ll serve both purposes simultaneously, try freezing old beer bottles filled with water instead. You can also take this idea a step further by how to make ice blocks for coolers using a how to make ice blocks for coolers ring or how to make ice blocks for coolers cap that’s been filled with water and then frozen.

Conclusion

If you’ve read through this article, then we hope it has helped clear up any confusion or uncertainty about how to make ice blocks for coolers. Now that you know all the different methods out there, which one are you going to try? Have fun cooling off with your new knowledge!

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